Blaydes House

The East Coast War Channels in the First World War

The East Coast war channels were a system of defended shipping routes established in the early months of the First World War and maintained throughout the conflict. Hugging the coast between the Thames and the Forth, the Channels were a target for U-boat attacks: more than a thousand vessels were sunk.

In this lecture, Antony Firth discusses investigations (supported by Historic England) of the largely forgotten history of the war channels and their archaeological remains, both on the seabed and along England’s east coast.

Entry is free and no ticket is needed. Places are on a first-come, first-served basis, so latecomers may not be admitted when the lecture room is full.

Annual Public History Lecture – King Charles I, Parliamentary Sovereignty and Brexit: The Relevance of History

Speaker: Professor Glenn Burgess, Professor of History at the University of Hull

Our world is awash with historical claims and comparisons. You can hardly read a newspaper or check your Twitter feed without coming across comparisons between today’s politics and the 1930s. Neo-liberal capitalism, it is said, is returning us to the gross inequalities of America’s Gilded Age of the late 19th century. Climate activism draws comparison, not always admiring, with the student politics of the 1960s. And – as this lecture will suggest – comparison can be drawn between the parliamentary troubles of a seventeenth-century monarch and a twenty-first- century prime minister. And yet, at the same time, in our education system and our culture, History and the Humanities are threatened, their relevance, usefulness and value questioned. This lecture will explore the essential role played by History in helping us to make sense of the human world that we inhabit, and the importance of historical literacy for a healthy democratic society.

Bad Doctors and Graphic Medicine

Best-selling author Ian Williams is coming to Hull in November for a talk about his work as a GP, comics artist and writer. His graphic novel The Bad Doctor was published in 2014 to critical acclaim, causing Alison Bechdel to declare him as “the best thing to happen to medicine since penicillin”. Ian has also penned a series of comic strips for The Guardian about the trials and tribulations of working within the NHS, and his novels and comic art are humane, moving and highly witty views onto the contradictions and challenges of modern medicine. This promises to be an engaging and thought-provoking evening.

The evening starts at 6pm with a drinks reception and the talk begins at 6.30pm.

See our website for more details: www.hullmedicalsociety.co.uk/events

Image credited to Hull Medical Society

The Institute of Applied Ethics presents: Dr Vanja Čelebičić

The Institute of Applied Ethics presents: Dr Vanja Čelebičić (Migration Yorkshire) ‘The Ethics and Practice of Digital Storytelling as a Research Method with Young People who Seek Asylum in the UK’

Digital technologies are increasingly shaping the research methods used in social sciences while opening up new possibilities for collaboration between researchers and research participants. Equally, they pose new and maintain some old challenges when it comes to ethics.

In this presentation, Vanja focuses on ethical dilemmas related to the use of digital storytelling as a research method. Drawing on the experience of using digital storytelling as a research method when working with minors who arrived to the UK unaccompanied to seek asylum, Vanja will examine two things. First, she will look at two interrelated aspects – the bureaucracy of ethics and the humanity of ethics. While both seem to be crucial elements of conducting research, at times there seems to be dissonance between them. And secondly, Vanja examines how these two aspects relate to the use of digital technologies, and what ‘capabilities’ the use of digital technologies affords that makes research more collaborative and hence also more ethical.

OpenCampus Tea-Time Talks

OpenCampus Tea-Time Talks – Gothic Nature presents ‘Landfills and Garbage in American Gothic imagination’

Layla Hendow, PhD candidate in English literature; Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

If garbage is a contemporary gothic symbol, it aptly represents a waste crisis that is both caused by humans and feared by them. Landfills are the modern equivalent of gothic landscapes or architecture: huge mounds of trash that cause emotions of fear and remind people of death, decay and destruction. Potential new developments are met with cries of “Not in my back yard!” from a public who don’t want to have to encounter their waste.

This talk grows out Layla’s research on waste in contemporary American literature. Using a variety of examples, the talk will look at how waste and garbage became a contemporary gothic trope – at once a source of fear on the one hand and sublimity on the other.

OpenCampus Reading Group Series

OpenCampus Reading Group Series – Books on Film presents Notes on a Scandal (2003), Zoë Heller

Host: Anna Beaumont, OpenCampus Reading Group member

Come along for an interesting and lively discussion where our speaker will consider Notes on a Scandal and its film adaptation.

Free admission – all welcome. Booking is required.

Christmas Spirits with Mike Covell

Amazing Hull Tours and Hotham’s Gin School and Distillery present:

Christmas Spirits

Dim the lights, huddle closer and prepare to be spooked!

Join us at Hotham’s Distillery for an intimate evening of Christmas spirit, with local historian and author, Mike Covell – famous for his Amazing Hull Tours.

Meet us at the Lowgate gates of the historic Hepworth’s Arcade and make your way to our distillery where you’ll be greeted with a Hotham’s gin and tonic.

As night falls on the deserted arcade, you’ll hear Christmas stories about the ghosts that haunt the historic Old Town, including Hepworth’s Arcade itself.

You’ll enjoy more spinetingling spirits and stories over another gin and tonic while Mike continues his fascinating talk about the area.

The evening lasts for 2 hours, and you’ll be served two drinks made with Hotham’s Gin (soft drinks are available).

This is an intimate evening so tickets are limited – book yours today!

Spectres & Spirits with Mike Covell

Amazing Hull Tours and Hotham’s Gin School and Distillery present:

Spectres and Spirits

It’s the eve of All Souls’ Day so let’s dim the lights, huddle closer and prepare to be spooked!

Join us at Hotham’s Distillery for an intimate evening of Spectres and Spirits, with local historian and author, Mike Covell – famous for his Amazing Hull Tours.

Meet us at the Lowgate gates of the historic Hepworth’s Arcade and make your way to our Distillery where you’ll be greeted with a Hotham’s gin and tonic.

As night falls on the deserted Arcade, you’ll hear local ghost stories and learn about the ghosts who haunt the historic Old Town, including Hepworth’s Arcade itself.

You’ll enjoy more spinetingling spirits and stories over another gin and tonic while Mike continues his fascinating talk about the area.

The evening lasts for 2 hours, and you’ll be served two drinks made with Hotham’s Gin (soft drinks are available).

This is an intimate evening so tickets are limited – book yours today!

Included:
A fascinating insight into Hull’s paranormal activities and spooky past
2 x Hotham’s gin and mixers

Viewing of ‘I am the Coyote’ rare books & archive material

Guided viewing of the archive of manuscripts, rare books, original writings, press cuttings and other printed ephemera connected to the Special Unit at HMP Barlinnie and the life and work of Joseph Beuys.

Taking place in the Rare Books collection, 7th Floor, Brynmor Jones Library. Please meet in the ‘I am the Coyote’ exhibition space. Due to certain restrictions of the 7th floor collections, if you have accessibility requirements please contact us at culture@hull.ac.uk or on 01482 465683 for further information before booking.

Free tour, booking essential due to limited spaces.
NB: Photography of the items is not permitted. No pens are allowed. Pencils, laptops, and tablets are fine

Aniara Omann. Photo by Kah-Bee Chow

Artist Talk: Aniara Omann

Join artist Aniara Omann for an introduction to her work and research into futurology, alternate realities, bioconscious materials and human physiology.

Omann’s new exhibition Equanipolis opens on 12 October in Galleries 1 & 2.

In Conversation:Aniara Omann and John Heffernan

Join artist Aniara Omann and Senior Curator John Heffernan to discuss Equanipolis, a new exhibition of work by Omann. The discussion takes place on the first day of the exhibition, giving you a rare opportunity to talk to the artist directly about her new work.

A Pint of Business and Culture: ‘The Power of Stories’

Whether it’s Hull, Hanoi or Harlem, stories are the glue that binds us. Throughout history, stories have been a means of bringing people together around powerful ideas. They provide us with an opportunity to share common experiences, reinvent our future and build powerful human bonds. Inspiring stories are at the heart of great leadership, and in this session we’ll explore their influence over our lives.

Blaydes House

From the Art of Sailing to the Science of Navigation

The Pacific theatre of World War II represents a turning point in the history of navigation – when practical observation of weather conditions was supplanted by land-based weather forecasts, generated with newly developed technologies. The question was whether a ship’s commander should entrust the safety of his vessel to his own judgement or instead rely on radio broadcasts, the beginnings of ‘big data’, and the output of machines.

US naval campaigns in the Western Pacific and South China Seas during World War II provide notable occasions when the old and the new knowledge were tested under extreme weather conditions and the exigencies of wartime operations. This lecture examines the role of typhoons and the science about their prediction in relation to US naval operations in the Pacific Ocean theatre in 1944 in 1945.

Entry is free; no ticket is needed. Places are on a first-come, first-served basis, so latecomers may not be admitted when the lecture room is full.

Sir Lenny Henry in Conversation

Sir Lenny Henry – writer, comedian, actor and activist – will be taking us on a candid journey through his life and career in this exclusive event at the University of Hull to help mark Black History Month.

The event will begin with a short talk from Sir Lenny followed by an in-depth interview as well as an opportunity for audience members to ask questions. There will also be a special meet and greet opportunity for some of our students.

Please do join us for what promises to be an incredibly interesting and informative event.

Black History Month at the University of Hull
Black History Month (BHM) is celebrated in October every year. It focuses on the history and heritage of Asian, African and African Caribbean peoples.

Here at the University of Hull, Black History Month provides us with an opportunity to promote knowledge of black history, culture and heritage, and to disseminate information on positive black contributions to British society. It celebrates this contribution through a series of events taking place throughout the month which help us to think and value the role that Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) people have played in shaping Britain’s history.

There will be a series of events during the month and one of the highlights will be a talk from Sir Lenny Henry on Wednesday 2 October and a screening of crowd-funded film ‘Gambia’ by local band Bud Sugar on 7 October. Details of further events will follow, please keep an eye on Culturenet.

The University of Hull recognises the contribution BME people have made across all aspects of modern Britain such as academia, medicine, science, sport, art, film, politics and services.

OpenCampus Culture Café Series: ‘Space: The Final Frontier’ ‘What do Atoms tell us about Galaxies?’

Talk by Dr Gareth Few, Astrophysicist, Research Associate at the E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Hull.

The world around us is made up of atoms. The galaxy around us is made up of atoms too. The types of atoms we see tells us a great deal about the early stages of the universe and even how galaxies were created. I will take you on a journey from the first few minutes after the Big Bang right up to the present day and explain how we can uncover the secret history of galaxies using the periodic table.

Gareth is an astrophysicist working at the University of Hull where he uses computer simulations to model the formation and evolution of spiral galaxies. He studies the processes which shape galaxies and how different chemical elements are produced in the Universe. In his work he uses some of the world’s most powerful supercomputers, without which these sophisticated hydrodynamics models would be impossible.

OpenCampus Culture Café Series: ‘Space: The Final Frontier’ ‘Wonders of the Universe’

Talk by Professor Brad Gibson, Head of Physics & Maths and Director of the E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Hull.

In a Universe filled with stunning sights and sounds, a handful are of such remarkable power, fury, and beauty, that they must be seen to be believed. Join Professor Brad Gibson on an intergalactic tour and travel to the most awe-inspiring (and terrifying) corners of our Universe. If you thought your Bucket List was complete, think again!

Professor Brad Gibson is the Head of Physics & Maths and Director of the E.A. Milne Centre for Astrophysics at the University of Hull. Brad completed his MSc and PhD at the University of British Columbia, building the world’s first Liquid Mirror Telescope Observatory and designing software to map the distribution of the chemical elements throughout the Universe. Brad was responsible for using exploding stars to determine the expansion rate of the Universe, as part of the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale, for which the team was awarded the Gruber Prize in Cosmology. He was the first to identify the locations within the Milky Way most likely to harbour complex biological life, for which his work was named by National Geographic magazine as one of the top 10 news stories of the year.

Brad’s work has been acknowledged by his peers 20,000 times, making him Hull’s most cited academic, and one of the top few percent in the world. His outreach efforts led to him being named the Institute of Physics’ John Porter Memorial Lecturer, the 2019 Leon Davies Lecturer, the Bexwyke Lecturer, and the Ray Bootland Lecturer; he has spoken at the Cheltenham Science Festival, the British Science Festival, the Royal Institution of Great Britain, opened for Brian Cox and Lucy Hawking at European AstroFest, and delivered a highly popular TED talk on the subject of the search for alien life.