Humber Street Gallery

JAMIE CREWE: SOLIDARITY & LOVE

Solidarity & Love is a new collection of work by Glasgow-based artist Jamie Crewe. The exhibition at Humber Street Gallery has been created alongside a sister show at Grand Union, Birmingham titled Love & Solidarity.

Taking inspiration from Radclyffe Hall’s novel The Well of Loneliness (1928), the exhibitions address the provocations of the book, which has had a lasting impact on generations of queer, lesbian, and transgender people.

Through a combination of video, sculpture and text, Crewe touches on themes of heartbreak, experiences of transphobia, LGBT solidarity and conflict, as well as exploring the legacy of the novel itself.

Both exhibitions can be enjoyed independently of each other and are supported by a series of events across Hull and Birmingham.

Edges-in-Blues-and-Greys-in-detail-by-Julie-Massie

The Winter Show

The Winter Show marks the finale of the Studio Eleven celebrations of a decade of creative residence on Humber Street in Hull.
From the Jurassic Coastline to the boulder clay of the Humber Region, the chalk line brings these artists together for The Winter Show.
The exhibition features a selection of contemporary ceramics by Julie Massie, Adele Howitt, Martin Harman and Emma Williams amongst our gallery artists, with paintings by Deborah Grice and Myles Linley.

Reflection: British Art in an Age of Change

This major partnership exhibition features over 120 artworks. They are drawn jointly from the Ingram Collection of Modern British and Contemporary Art, and the Ferens collection.

Visitors will have the opportunity to enjoy important artworks new to Hull, in conversation with existing highlights from the local collection. A number of Ferens works are rarely seen treasures, including watercolours, prints and drawings less often on public display due to their fragility to light.

Reflection presents a dynamic and diverse vision of Britain and British art, which asks questions about identity and belonging. What does it mean to be British? How do we define British art? How do we present ourselves to the world?

Some of the artists were born in Britain and travelled elsewhere through choice or necessity; others were born elsewhere and travelled here. Some artists worked a hundred years ago; others are just starting on their careers.

Equanipolis: Aniara Omann

Our collective hope for what the future might look like is heavily shaped by both our past and present. Danish artist Aniara Omann considers just this in Equanipolis; a new exhibition of work at Humber Street Gallery.

The two-floor exhibition uses sculpture, textiles and animatronics to explore what the future of humanity might look like. Investigating how our vision of the future is influenced by our experiences with science-fiction film and TV, as well as modern day social and environmental issues.

Omann’s dark and futuristic sculptures use traditional special effects techniques such as silicone–based casting, as well as newer bio-conscious materials that mimic human skin.

Inspired by traditional prop-making, vintage fashion and popular sci-fi, Equanipolis invites you to step into an alternate reality and reconsider the past, present and future.

Exhibition Preview: Equanipolis

Join us in the Gallery Café and Galleries 1 & 2 for the Exhibition Preview of Equanipolis.

The two-floor exhibition uses sculpture, textiles and animatronics to explore what the future of humanity might look like. Investigating how our vision of the future is influenced by our experiences with science-fiction film and TV, as well as modern day social and environmental issues.

Omann’s dark and futuristic sculptures use traditional special effects techniques such as silicone–based casting, as well as newer bio-conscious materials that mimic human skin.

Inspired by traditional prop-making, vintage fashion and popular sci-fi, Equanipolis invites you to step into an alternate reality and reconsider the past, present and future.

Curator’s Tour: Proboscidea Rappings

Join Senior Curator John Heffernan for a guided tour and introduction to Ollie Dook’s new exhibition Proboscidea Rappings.

Jumbo the Elephant was one of the first modern day animal celebrities. Born in 1861 Jumbo tragically died in 1885 after a fatal collision with a train. The impact of his brief time on this planet was felt on a global scale.

Artist Ollie Dook examines the story of an archived photograph which depicts an imitation ‘Jumbo’ crossing Hull’s Monument Bridge in the 19th Century as part of Barnum’s circus parade.

Image credited to Animal Stories. The Painting Elephant. Courtesy of Ollie Dook.

Exhibition Preview: Proboscidea Rappings

Join us in the Gallery Café and Project Space for the exhibition preview of Proboscidea Rappings by Ollie Dook.

Jumbo the Elephant was one of the first modern day animal celebrities. Born in 1861 Jumbo tragically died in 1885 after a fatal collision with a train. The impact of his brief time on this planet was felt on a global scale.

Artist Ollie Dook examines the story of an archived photograph which depicts an imitation ‘Jumbo’ crossing Hull’s Monument Bridge in the 19th Century as part of Barnum’s circus parade.

Through an exhibition that combines video and sculpture, Dook offers up a new version of Jumbo, exploring the enormity of his physicality, popularity and impact on the world.

Exhibition Preview: Wrapping

Join us for the Exhibition Preview of Nnena Kalu’s exhibition Wrapping. The preview takes place midway through Kalu’s week-long live installation.

Nnena Kalu’s colourful sculptures are created by layering and binding materials such as industrial plastic tubing, newspaper, foam, cling film, fabric and tape. Kalu will construct a series of large-scale sculptures which playfully wrap around the gallery, responding to the unique architecture of the Project Space.

Nnena Kalu is a studio artist at ActionSpace, a London based visual arts organisation that supports artists with learning disabilities.

Image credited to: Nnena Kalu for Glasgow International 2018

Live Install: Nnena Kalu

Experience artist Nnena Kalu’s energetic creative process during a performance-like installation of her exhibition Wrapping.

Nnena Kalu’s colourful sculptures are created by layering and binding materials such as industrial plastic tubing, newspaper, foam, cling film, fabric and tape. Kalu will construct a series of large-scale sculptures which playfully wrap around the gallery, responding to the unique architecture of the Project Space.

Nnena Kalu is a studio artist at ActionSpace, a London based visual arts organisation that supports artists with learning disabilities.

Nnena Kalu in Belgium

Viewing of ‘I am the Coyote’ rare books and archive material

Guided viewing of the archive of manuscripts, rare books, original writings, press cuttings and other printed ephemera connected to the Special Unit at HMP Barlinnie and the life and work of Joseph Beuys.

Taking place in the Rare Books collection, 7th Floor, Brynmor Jones Library. Please meet in the ‘I am the Coyote’ exhibition space. Due to certain restrictions of the 7th floor collections, if you have accessibility requirements please contact us at culture@hull.ac.uk or on 01482 465683 for further information before booking.

Free tour, booking essential due to limited spaces.
NB: Photography of the items is not permitted. No pens are allowed. Pencils, laptops, and tablets are fine.

COMING HOME: William Wilberforce

Sir Thomas Lawrence’s famous portrait of William Wilberforce will be exhibited in Hull at the Ferens Art Gallery as part of a major project launched by the National Portrait Gallery. The COMING HOME project sees the National Portrait Gallery lend 50 portraits of iconic individuals to places across the UK with which they are most closely associated.

William Wilberforce was born in 1759, the son of a Hull merchant. In 1780, Wilberforce was elected MP for Hull, and through tireless efforts, became the parliamentary spokesperson for the British campaign to abolish Transatlantic Slavery.

As Wilberforce’s portrait will journey home, an accompanying exhibition will look at the journey of his legacy. Starting with Wilberforce, his life in Hull and his pivotal role in the Abolition campaign, the exhibition will explore how his memory has been celebrated in the City and inspired anti-slavery campaigner Salim Charles Wilson in the 1900s. The exhibition also includes a 2007 commission for Hull by Jamaican artist Keith Piper to mark the national bicentenary of the abolition of the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

The portrait will be on display in the Ferens Art Gallery together with works from the Ferens, and Wilberforce House Museum permanent collections.

LOST: Photography Exhibition

Take a look at this inspiring collection of images recording the development of the Lost Trawlerman Memorial in Hull by Nigel Walker.

In 2003 Saint Andrews Dock Heritage Park Action Group launched a public appeal to raise money for a memorial to over 6000 fishermen who gave their lives in the fishing industry sailing from Hull. In 2015 Peter Naylor won a public vote on submitted designs. This design in weathered steel now stands on St Andrews Quay, on a temporary site. Once work is completed on flood defences in the area a memorial garden will be completed and the sculpture will be moved there as a centrepiece.

Nigel Walker worked with STAND and Peter Naylor to record the making of the memorial – from early design work in the studio, to the cutting of the steel, erection on site and the dedication of the monument by the Archbishop of York in 2017. Nigel continues to visit and photograph the sculpture and will eventually finalise this documentary when the memorial garden is completed sometime in 2020. Fundraising for the garden continues.

Location: The Carriage House, open daily from 10am – 5pm

This exhibition is included with the normal admission charges.

Credit image to Venture Arts

Footnotes on Equality Preview Event

Footnotes on Equality is an exhibition created by fifteen international researchers as part of the European Commission-funded project Gender and Cultures of Equality in Europe (GRACE) (www.graceproject.eu and www.footnotesonequality.eu). The exhibition curates an eclectic collection of art and everyday objects that speak to cultural productions of (in)equalities across Europe.

The collection includes an array of material including field notes, audio and visual recordings, transcriptions, artworks, and readymade objects all arising from the diverse research conducted through the GRACE project.

The exhibition highlights the desire to question current mainstream notions of equality in Europe and to show that struggles are ongoing and incomplete. The title ‘Footnotes’ emphasizes the object collection as evidence, additional support, critique, alternative perspectives, diverse insights and anecdotes that supplement academic readings.

Accessible text, BSL interpreter present at Preview Event, Wheelchair Accessible, Hearing Loop, Disabled Access toilets. If you have any specific needs that are not listed, please email info@artlinkhull.co.uk so that we can facilitate your access.

Footnotes on Equality

Footnotes on Equality is an exhibition created by fifteen international researchers as part of the European Commission-funded project Gender and Cultures of Equality in Europe (GRACE) (www.graceproject.eu and www.footnotesonequality.eu). The exhibition curates an eclectic collection of art and everyday objects that speak to cultural productions of (in)equalities across Europe.

The collection includes an array of material including field notes, audio and visual recordings, transcriptions, artworks, and readymade objects all arising from the diverse research conducted through the GRACE project.

The exhibition highlights the desire to question current mainstream notions of equality in Europe and to show that struggles are ongoing and incomplete. The title ‘Footnotes’ emphasizes the object collection as evidence, additional support, critique, alternative perspectives, diverse insights and anecdotes that supplement academic readings.

Exhibition Opening Hours: Tuesdays to Saturdays from 07 September to 11 October 2019, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Monday viewing available by request. Please email info@artlinkhull.co.uk

Accessible text, BSL interpreter present at Preview Event, Wheelchair Accessible, Hearing Loop,, Disabled Access toilets. If you have any specific needs that are not listed, please email info@artlinkhull.co.uk so that we can facilitate your access.

GIN AND CANAPES EVENING

Grab a fellow Gin enthusiast and join us for an evening where you can discover the flavours of Hull’s Humber Street Distillery with a Gin and Canapes tasting experience. 18+ only.

What’s included?

A welcome cocktail

3 Gin drinks + canapes

A Humber Street Distillery representative to give you an insight into the spirit

Ollie Dook: Proboscidea Rappings

Jumbo the Elephant was one of the first modern day animal celebrities. Born in 1861 Jumbo tragically died in 1885 after a fatal collision with a train. The impact of his brief time on this planet was felt on a global scale.

Artist Ollie Dook examines the story of an archived photograph which depicts an imitation ‘Jumbo’ crossing Hull’s Monument Bridge in the 19th Century as part of Barnum’s circus parade.

Through an exhibition that combines video and sculpture, Dook offers up a new version of Jumbo, exploring the enormity of his physicality, popularity and impact on the world.